A Day of Stress

If you’ve been following me on Twitter, you know these past few days have been rather stressful. Here’s why:

First, now that a site has been selected for the Pond Sand Filter (which is what you guys voted for by leaving comments and video responses on the video I made called “Challenge Poverty”), the task is now to get this done on-time and on-budget. Save the Children is trying their best of course – but Murphy’s Law is always in-effect for this kind of work 🙁

The other big thing I’m stressing about is that it appears that YouTube is now blocked in Bangladesh. This isn’t the first time that Google services have been inaccessible from Bangladesh. I’m not going to jump the gun and say it’s government censorship. But, thus far, I’ve confirmed that YouTube is inaccessible in two different cities in Bangladesh through numerous internet service providers includingL the ISP I use while in Dhaka, GrameenPhone which I use while in the field, and even the internet service that Save the Children uses for its offices here in Bangladesh.

This could be a glitch or a temporary block. But, if indeed the government is restricting access to YouTube, this definitely puts a kink in this project. There are still tons of (legal) ways to make sure I can get new videos onto the UnculturedProject YouTube channel, but this makes everything harder. And YouTube is more than just a place to upload or watch videos – it’s about access to a community. And it’s that community that has been a huge source of support for this work.

Finally, I’ve been stressed a lot lately because, even if everything goes according to plan – there is no such thing as “perfect”. When it comes to providing safe and clean drinking water to rural villages, verything has its pros and cons. A deep tube well has the risk of arsenic, iron, and (depending on where you are in the country) of salt water. A pond sand filter, on the other hand, only works as well as the community that is maintaining it. If they don’t maintain it – it will just gather dust. And even if they do maintain it, they are only designed to last 3 or so years at normal use.

Hopefully I’ll catch a break somewhere: be it restoring access to YouTube or getting this Pond Sand Filter done on-time and/or within-budget.

4 Responses to “A Day of Stress”


  1. 1 Owen

    Your project has to be not only worthwhile but realistic. What’s important is coming up with a solution that works in the real world. It’s easy to put in a simple piece of equipment that works and replicate it. The real achievement is if you can get this project to become sefl-sustaining. That means working with the people of the village until they’re ready to take up the challenge of looking after the filter for themselves. And then ensuring there’s a system in place so that they can set about the replacement process themselves. If you can get that set up you’ll really have achieved something.

  2. 2 Owen

    Your project has to be not only worthwhile but realistic. What’s important is coming up with a solution that works in the real world. It’s easy to put in a simple piece of equipment that works and replicate it. The real achievement is if you can get this project to become sefl-sustaining. That means working with the people of the village until they’re ready to take up the challenge of looking after the filter for themselves. And then ensuring there’s a system in place so that they can set about the replacement process themselves. If you can get that set up you’ll really have achieved something.

  3. 3 Amy

    Thank You for sharing your knowledge.

  4. 4 Amy

    Thank You for sharing your knowledge.

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